The Boulder Bookstore at night. (That’s my kid stomping in to buy some Asterix comics)

The Boulder Bookstore at night. (That’s my kid stomping in to buy some Asterix comics)

I’ve been thinking about how grandmas 30+ years ago usually kept candy on display. I’ll bet there’s some social significance to that. Maybe after the Great Depression a fancy dish containing candy (an extravagance) was a way to symbolize financial success. It also seems like in the mid-20th century there was a greater emphasis on entertaining guests. Anyway, grandkids like me always appreciated it.

A WWII GI reading somewhere in Germany, January, 3, 1946. ( image via BooksForVictory.com )

A WWII GI reading somewhere in Germany, January, 3, 1946. ( image via BooksForVictory.com )

I took the above photo of the ABC Book by C. B. Falls (published 1923) which is on display in the Random House’s office lobby.

Falls illustrated lots of books and book-related posters during both world wars (read more on BooksForVictory.com).

I drew some brainy spot illustrations for the inside of The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons by Sam Kean. —Andrew

My wife made natural food coloring with berries and veggies. She’ll put the recipe up soon on her Spunky Coconut blog. I just love how the rainbow cake looks!

quotedquarterly:

Bilbo Baggins misses his books.
—Andrew

As a long-time fan of the books, I grumble at a lot of the silly changes Peter Jackson made to The Hobbit story, but yesterday’s article on Tor.com kind of brought be around: "Concerning Hobbits, On-Screen and Off: Why Jackson and Tolkien Can Peacefully Co-exist"

quotedquarterly:

Bilbo Baggins misses his books.

Andrew

As a long-time fan of the books, I grumble at a lot of the silly changes Peter Jackson made to The Hobbit story, but yesterday’s article on Tor.com kind of brought be around: "Concerning Hobbits, On-Screen and Off: Why Jackson and Tolkien Can Peacefully Co-exist"

Spoiler alert: Samwell Tarly does some reading at his local Night’s Watch library in A Feast for Crows.

Spoiler alert: Samwell Tarly does some reading at his local Night’s Watch library in A Feast for Crows.

It was believed that the Medieval abbey lubber (or butter spirit), “inhabited abbeys that had become wanton and overluxurious. His aim was to tempt monks into drunkenness and gluttony.” Quote from Spirits, Fairies, Leprechauns, and Goblins: An Encyclopedia.

It was believed that the Medieval abbey lubber (or butter spirit), “inhabited abbeys that had become wanton and overluxurious. His aim was to tempt monks into drunkenness and gluttony.” Quote from Spirits, Fairies, Leprechauns, and Goblins: An Encyclopedia.

Coral and the vanishing Aral Sea from a kids’ environmental science book I illustrated.